Why is Tyler the Creator the villain of Popstar?

Is authenticity, or at least audacity, the enemy of commercial art? And is authenticity just a moment away from selling out, as soon as someone asks it to?

I’m not quite sure of what I’d have to say myself, but I’m curious as hell what Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping thinks, because it seems to have made one of the most authentic…or audacious rappers out there into its ostensible antagonist.

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My Top 10: American Psycho

#9

American Psycho

This film was made in Toronto, Canada. It’s name is American Psycho. It’s 16 years old. It believes in satirizing an 80s masculine culture that led to the eventual financial collapse, and doing so with a balanced sense of dark humor and a rigorous understanding of horror cliches. In the original book, if the plot is a little puffy, it’ll cut out some of the grosser horror bits and fashion references. It cut about a thousand or so. It always uses a deep feminist stance with little or no irony, because irony dries your humor out and makes you look clumsy.

It has an idea of Patrick Bateman, some kind of larger abstraction, but cleverly avoid any real him. He’s only an entity, something illusory. Christian Bale’s performance hides his cold gaze, and you can imagine shaking his hand and feeling flesh gripping yours and maybe you can even sense his performance is grounded in the original source material, it simply is not there.

Okay, that was fun.

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Negotiating the Art and the Artist From My Archives: Megadeth’s Dystopia

Another one to whet reader appetites. This one was written in January after the release of Megadeth’s Dystopia. I had been seeking a way to talk about this topic as well as heavy metal for a little while. I found it sitting in LAX.

Summer brought us the seeming toppling of two of comedy’s greats. Bill Cosby and Woody Allen, both rocked by sex scandals very different in their details, yet seemingly similar in the wide attention it brought. But the after effects were very different.

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The Fault In Me Before You

It’s only natural something as successful as The Fault in Our Stars would birth a few imitators, though I didn’t quite think we would still be seeing them two years down the line. I also didn’t think I would see one quite so brazen as Me Before You, which seeks to imitate everything down to the damned release date.

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Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping is the comedy of the summer

I legitimately think it’s one of the most exciting things in the world to be there at the beginning of a cult comedy. To hear the uneven laughter of the crowd as an underlayer to your own riotous guffawing is a unique theatergoing experience. To know that there are going to be years you’re making references to it to a number of blank stares. To know that it’s going to be a friendship test for years to come.

It’s a long way to say welcome to the comedy cult canon Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping!

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The 5 Greatest Lonely Island Digital Shorts

In celebration of this weekend’s release of Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping, I thought it would do us all a little good to look back on the career that got The Lonely Island to the point that they got to make a feature film and remind you how fucking funny Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone, and Akiva Schaffer are.

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